What about Multivitamins?

A recent large study concluded:

After a median follow-up of 8.0 and 7.9 years in the clinical trial and observational study cohorts, respectively, the Women’s Health Initiative study provided convincing evidence that multivitamin use has little or no influence on the risk of common cancers, CVD, or total mortality in postmenopausal women.

I think this supports what I’ve been saying. In this blog I’ve emphasized two deficiencies in the American diet:

  • Not enough omega-3
  • Not enough fermented food

Neither is reduced by a multivitamin pill. As far as I can tell, when either one is fixed with something resembling an optimal dose, there are easy-to-notice benefits. Before I started making these points, there were plenty of reasons to think these are major deficiencies. For example, the Aquatic Ape Hypothesis suggested that we might need more omega-3 than we usually get. The Umami Hypothesis suggested we need a lot more fermented food than we usually eat. In contrast, I can’t think of a single reason to think that Americans suffer from major vitamin deficiencies. I take a multivitamin pill but I’d stop long before I’d give up flaxseed oil or fermented foods.

5 Replies to “What about Multivitamins?”

  1. For further comparison dark skin people have greater Vitamin D3 deficiency living in northern climates, which might explain cancer and other difference between racial groups.

  2. Once again, I need a translator. 😎 What does this mean in layman’s terms?

    “After a median follow-up of 8.0 and 7.9 years in the clinical trial and observational study cohorts,…”

    Were the subjects of the study given a multivitamin to take for 8 years?

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